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12 Pitch Or Promotion Tactics Agencies Use That May Border On 'Salesy' Or Even Sleazy

12 Pitch Or Promotion Tactics Agencies Use That May Border On 'Salesy' Or Even Sleazy

12 Pitch Or Promotion Tactics Agencies Use That May Border On 'Salesy' Or Even Sleazy

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Members of Forbes Agency Council share marketing techniques some agencies
have used that may leave a bad impression with potential clients.

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While every advertising agency is a little different, with their own techniques, styles and approaches, some agencies tend to do things a little too differently. When putting together pitches for new or potential clients or advertising their services, some agencies may go too far. In an effort to develop an “edge” that sets them apart, agencies may use tactics that they believe are attention-getting or cutting-edge, but that potential clients may find “salesy” or even a little sleazy.

Savvy business leaders can sense an inauthentic, pushy promotion a mile away, so agencies need to set boundaries and avoid questionable strategies in their proposals and advertising. Below, 12 members of Forbes Agency Council share some of the tactics agencies    sometimes use in their pitches or marketing that can come across as overly promotional or even dishonest.

"We’re all told to “be thought leaders.” But for some agency folks, once they land the panels or speaking gigs, the opportunity to self-promote is tempting. I understand this instinct. But my advice is to do adjacent-promotion: Brag about your clients! It comes across as far more gracious, strengthens the client relationship and is an easy way to tuck in the work your team did for the campaign."

 Megan Cunningham, Magnet Media, Inc.

 

While every advertising agency is a little different, with their own techniques, styles and approaches, some agencies tend to do things a little too differently. When putting together pitches for new or potential clients or advertising their services, some agencies may go too far. In an effort to develop an “edge” that sets them apart, agencies may use tactics that they believe are attention-getting or cutting-edge, but that potential clients may find “salesy” or even a little sleazy.

Savvy business leaders can sense an inauthentic, pushy promotion a mile away, so agencies need to set boundaries and avoid questionable strategies in their proposals and advertising. Below, 12 members of Forbes Agency Council share some of the tactics agencies    sometimes use in their pitches or marketing that can come across as overly promotional or even dishonest.

"We’re all told to “be thought leaders.” But for some agency folks, once they land the panels or speaking gigs, the opportunity to self-promote is tempting. I understand this instinct. But my advice is to do adjacent-promotion: Brag about your clients! It comes across as far more gracious, strengthens the client relationship and is an easy way to tuck in the work your team did for the campaign."

 Megan Cunningham, Magnet Media, Inc.

 

While every advertising agency is a little different, with their own techniques, styles and approaches, some agencies tend to do things a little too differently. When putting together pitches for new or potential clients or advertising their services, some agencies may go too far. In an effort to develop an “edge” that sets them apart, agencies may use tactics that they believe are attention-getting or cutting-edge, but that potential clients may find “salesy” or even a little sleazy.

Savvy business leaders can sense an inauthentic, pushy promotion a mile away, so agencies need to set boundaries and avoid questionable strategies in their proposals and advertising. Below, 12 members of Forbes Agency Council share some of the tactics agencies sometimes use in their pitches or marketing that can come across as overly promotional or even dishonest.

"We’re all told to “be thought leaders.” But for some agency folks, once they land the panels or speaking gigs, the opportunity to self-promote is tempting. I understand this instinct. But my advice is to do adjacent-promotion: Brag about your clients! It comes across as far more gracious, strengthens the client relationship and is an easy way to tuck in the work your team did for the campaign."

–Megan Cunningham

1_Forbes_Council
Gordon Andrew

Highlander Consulting Inc.

2_Forbes_Council
Matt Berry

Conversion Agile Marketing

3_Forbes_Council
Megan Cunningham

Magnet Media, Inc.

4_Forbes_Council
Bernard May

National Positions

5_Forbes_Council
David Harrison

EVINS

6_Forbes_Council
Jessica    Hawthorne-Castro

Hawthorne LLC

7_Forbes_Council
Dmitrii Kustov

Regex SEO

8_Forbes_Council
Jessica Reznick

We’re Magnetic

9_Forbes_Council
Solomon Thimothy

OneIMS

10_Forbes_Council
Jon James

Ignited Results

11_Forbes_Council
Zachary Binder

Bell + Ivy

12_Forbes_Council
Tripp Donnelly

REQ

13_Forbes_Council
Lynne Golodner

You People LLC

14_Forbes_Council
Tony Pec

Y Not You Media

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