THE STATE OF THE STORY  —  STORIES THAT MATTER
THE STATE OF THE STORY  —  STORIES THAT MATTER

Helping Brands: How Companies Are Stepping Up for Ukraine

Helping Brands: How Companies Are Stepping Up for Ukraine

Helping Brands: How Companies Are Stepping Up for Ukraine

Helping Brands: How Companies Are Stepping Up for Ukraine

Helping Brands: How Companies Are Stepping Up for Ukraine

blog-ukraine

"Everyone seems to have an opinion, with many going beyond voicing it by acting."

"Everyone seems to have an opinion, with many going beyond voicing it by acting."

Much support and philanthropic aid have gone to the Ukrainian cause since Russia invaded its neighbor on February, 24, 2022. Everyone seems to have an opinion, with many going beyond voicing it by acting. Celebrities have alternated between cringy self-promotion (though he’s an amazing humanitarian, Bono’s poem was not cri de coeur he must have imagined) and actual fundraising (celebrity couples Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis, and Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively are matching the donations of us mere plebs). Politicians have been typically muddled—wanting to take a tough stance, but not too tough so the other side seems the irrational one.

A real shining spot has been how brands have shown up in this moment. What would have seemed impossible just last year became reality: oil giants Shell, Exon, and BP announced plans to leave Russia; McDonalds shuttered its 850 outposts there; Apple stopped selling its products. Sure, a lot of the moves have been in response to public outcry; sites like The Good Lobby make it easy for consumers to gauge brand behavior. But even if it’s a reaction to pressure, the outcome remains positive. 

Beyond halting business in Russia, many companies are doing what they do best for Ukraine. Here are some of our favorites that are both on-brand and substantive.

Much support and philanthropic aid have gone to the Ukrainian cause since Russia invaded its neighbor on February, 24, 2022. Everyone seems to have an opinion, with many going beyond voicing it by acting. Celebrities have alternated between cringy self-promotion (though he’s an amazing humanitarian, Bono’s poem was not cri de coeur he must have imagined) and actual fundraising (celebrity couples Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis, and Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively are matching the donations of us mere plebs). Politicians have been typically muddled—wanting to take a tough stance, but not too tough so the other side seems the irrational one.

A real shining spot has been how brands have shown up in this moment. What would have seemed impossible just last year became reality: oil giants Shell, Exon, and BP announced plans to leave Russia; McDonalds shuttered its 850 outposts there; Apple stopped selling its products. Sure, a lot of the moves have been in response to public outcry; sites like The Good Lobby make it easy for consumers to gauge brand behavior. But even if it’s a reaction to pressure, the outcome remains positive. 

Beyond halting business in Russia, many companies are doing what they do best for Ukraine. Here are some of our favorites that are both on-brand and substantive.

Much support and philanthropic aid have gone to the Ukrainian cause since Russia invaded its neighbor on February, 24, 2022. Everyone seems to have an opinion, with many going beyond voicing it by acting. Celebrities have alternated between cringy self-promotion (though he’s an amazing humanitarian, Bono’s poem was not cri de coeur he must have imagined) and actual fundraising (celebrity couples Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis, and Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively are matching the donations of us mere plebs). Politicians have been typically muddled—wanting to take a tough stance, but not too tough so the other side seems the irrational one.

A real shining spot has been how brands have shown up in this moment. What would have seemed impossible just last year became reality: oil giants Shell, Exon, and BP announced plans to leave Russia; McDonalds shuttered its 850 outposts there; Apple stopped selling its products. Sure, a lot of the moves have been in response to public outcry; sites like The Good Lobby make it easy for consumers to gauge brand behavior. But even if it’s a reaction to pressure, the outcome remains positive. 

Beyond halting business in Russia, many companies are doing what they do best for Ukraine. Here are some of our favorites that are both on-brand and substantive.

"What would have seemed impossible just last year became reality: oil giants Shell, Exon, and BP announced plans to leave Russia; McDonalds shuttered its 850 outposts there; Apple stopped selling its products."

"What would have seemed impossible just last year became reality: oil giants Shell, Exon, and BP announced plans to leave Russia; McDonalds shuttered its 850 outposts there; Apple stopped selling its products."

"What would have seemed impossible just last year became reality: oil giants Shell, Exon, and BP announced plans to leave Russia; McDonalds shuttered its 850 outposts there; Apple stopped selling its products." 

blog-ukraine-microsoft

Microsoft

Microsoft

Microsoft

There are many reasons why the tech behemoth is regularly rated one of the top companies both by consumers and employees. More often than not, Microsoft wades thoughtfully into controversial topics and social issues. Ukraine is no exception. Even before the invasion began, Microsoft’s Threat Intelligence Center identified cyberattacks targeting the country’s digital infrastructure. The company contacted Ukraine’s government and lent technical advice to counter the malware. Microsoft has also removed RT, Russia’s state-sponsored news org, from all its platforms, stopped sales in the country, and made philanthropic donations (including proceeds from the latest release of the video game Fortnite, which raised $36 million in relief funds in one day) to Ukrainian aid organizations.

There are many reasons why the tech behemoth is regularly rated one of the top companies both by consumers and employees. More often than not, Microsoft wades thoughtfully into controversial topics and social issues. Ukraine is no exception. Even before the invasion began, Microsoft’s Threat Intelligence Center identified cyberattacks targeting the country’s digital infrastructure. The company contacted Ukraine’s government and lent technical advice to counter the malware. Microsoft has also removed RT, Russia’s state-sponsored news org, from all its platforms, stopped sales in the country, and made philanthropic donations (including proceeds from the latest release of the video game Fortnite, which raised $36 million in relief funds in one day) to Ukrainian aid organizations.

There are many reasons why the tech behemoth is regularly rated one of the top companies both by consumers and employees. More often than not, Microsoft wades thoughtfully into controversial topics and social issues. Ukraine is no exception. Even before the invasion began, Microsoft’s Threat Intelligence Center identified cyberattacks targeting the country’s digital infrastructure. The company contacted Ukraine’s government and lent technical advice to counter the malware. Microsoft has also removed RT, Russia’s state-sponsored news org, from all its platforms, stopped sales in the country, and made philanthropic donations (including proceeds from the latest release of the video game Fortnite, which raised $36 million in relief funds in one day) to Ukrainian aid organizations.

blog-ukraine-loreal

L’Oreal

L’Oreal

L’Oreal

The French cosmetics company isn’t just putting a pretty face on its support for Ukraine. The world’s largest beauty marketer pulled the plug on its operations, stores, counters, ecommerce sites, and all paid media in Russia. Additionally, L’Oreal is providing global and local relief groups with donations up to $5.5 million and has already disbursed 250,000 personal care and hygiene products to refugees, with the promise of more to come.

The French cosmetics company isn’t just putting a pretty face on its support for Ukraine. The world’s largest beauty marketer pulled the plug on its operations, stores, counters, ecommerce sites, and all paid media in Russia. Additionally, L’Oreal is providing global and local relief groups with donations up to $5.5 million and has already disbursed 250,000 personal care and hygiene products to refugees, with the promise of more to come.

The French cosmetics company isn’t just putting a pretty face on its support for Ukraine. The world’s largest beauty marketer pulled the plug on its operations, stores, counters, ecommerce sites, and all paid media in Russia. Additionally, L’Oreal is providing global and local relief groups with donations up to $5.5 million and has already disbursed 250,000 personal care and hygiene products to refugees, with the promise of more to come.

blog-ukraine-airbnb

Airbnb

Airbnb

Airbnb

Early in the crisis, Airbnb announced it would provide free temporary housing for up to 100,000 refugees leaving Ukraine. They partnered with the International Organization for Migration to connect displaced millions with residences in neighboring countries and across the world. Recent reports indicate that the vacation rental company has acquired more than 21,500 hosts for the program—14,000 in Europe and 4,000 in the United States. Humanitarian housing is something of a reflex for Airbnb, which has previously opened doors to Afghan refugees and those fleeing disaster areas, as well as volunteer aid workers. The company’s platform also became a way for global do-gooders to drop money in the pockets of struggling Ukrainians simply by booking a stay at available properties, without the intention of actually visiting, of course.

Early in the crisis, Airbnb announced it would provide free temporary housing for up to 100,000 refugees leaving Ukraine. They partnered with the International Organization for Migration to connect displaced millions with residences in neighboring countries and across the world. Recent reports indicate that the vacation rental company has acquired more than 21,500 hosts for the program—14,000 in Europe and 4,000 in the United States. Humanitarian housing is something of a reflex for Airbnb, which has previously opened doors to Afghan refugees and those fleeing disaster areas, as well as volunteer aid workers. The company’s platform also became a way for global do-gooders to drop money in the pockets of struggling Ukrainians simply by booking a stay at available properties, without the intention of actually visiting, of course.

Early in the crisis, Airbnb announced it would provide free temporary housing for up to 100,000 refugees leaving Ukraine. They partnered with the International Organization for Migration to connect displaced millions with residences in neighboring countries and across the world. Recent reports indicate that the vacation rental company has acquired more than 21,500 hosts for the program—14,000 in Europe and 4,000 in the United States. Humanitarian housing is something of a reflex for Airbnb, which has previously opened doors to Afghan refugees and those fleeing disaster areas, as well as volunteer aid workers. The company’s platform also became a way for global do-gooders to drop money in the pockets of struggling Ukrainians simply by booking a stay at available properties, without the intention of actually visiting, of course.

"Humanitarian housing is something of a reflex for Airbnb, which has previously opened doors to Afghan refugees and those fleeing disaster areas, as well as volunteer aid workers."

 "Humanitarian housing is something of a reflex for Airbnb, which has previously opened doors to Afghan refugees and those fleeing disaster areas, as well as volunteer aid workers."

 

blog-ukraine-etsy

Etsy

Etsy

Etsy

Like Airbnb, Etsy’s peer-to-peer marketplace can also serve as a grassroots donation destination for the international community. By purchasing digital files of creators’ works on the site, customers are directly depositing funds into the accounts of the country’s struggling citizens. Etsy went ahead and waved the $4 million dollars in seller fees it would collect from any such transactions on its platform. It has also absorbed any listing or advertising fees for vendors in Ukraine, in addition to curating a shop of makers from the country on its site so that customers can easily find individuals to support.

Like Airbnb, Etsy’s peer-to-peer marketplace can also serve as a grassroots donation destination for the international community. By purchasing digital files of creators’ works on the site, customers are directly depositing funds into the accounts of the country’s struggling citizens. Etsy went ahead and waved the $4 million dollars in seller fees it would collect from any such transactions on its platform. It has also absorbed any listing or advertising fees for vendors in Ukraine, in addition to curating a shop of makers from the country on its site so that customers can easily find individuals to support.

Like Airbnb, Etsy’s peer-to-peer marketplace can also serve as a grassroots donation destination for the international community. By purchasing digital files of creators’ works on the site, customers are directly depositing funds into the accounts of the country’s struggling citizens. Etsy went ahead and waved the $4 million dollars in seller fees it would collect from any such transactions on its platform. It has also absorbed any listing or advertising fees for vendors in Ukraine, in addition to curating a shop of makers from the country on its site so that customers can easily find individuals to support.

blog-ukraine-flexport

Flexport

Flexport

Flexport

According to shipping and freight logistics company Flexport, 60 percent of relief supplies go to waste, never reaching the right destination at the right time. This is because of poor supply chain coordination. That’s where the impact arm of their company has stepped in: currently, Flexport.org is organizing relief shipments to refugee sites across Eastern Europe to aid fleeing Ukrainians. Many locations are already short on critical supplies like food, mattresses, medical supplies (bandages and suture equipment), sanitation kits, and tarps for emergency shelters. By partnering with UNICEF, Project HOPE, and Airlink, and utilizing its relationships with air and freight carriers, Flexport is able to put its expertise and influence to use for this humanitarian crisis.

According to shipping and freight logistics company Flexport, 60 percent of relief supplies go to waste, never reaching the right destination at the right time. This is because of poor supply chain coordination. That’s where the impact arm of their company has stepped in: currently, Flexport.org is organizing relief shipments to refugee sites across Eastern Europe to aid fleeing Ukrainians. Many locations are already short on critical supplies like food, mattresses, medical supplies (bandages and suture equipment), sanitation kits, and tarps for emergency shelters. By partnering with UNICEF, Project HOPE, and Airlink, and utilizing its relationships with air and freight carriers, Flexport is able to put its expertise and influence to use for this humanitarian crisis.

According to shipping and freight logistics company Flexport, 60 percent of relief supplies go to waste, never reaching the right destination at the right time. This is because of poor supply chain coordination. That’s where the impact arm of their company has stepped in: currently, Flexport.org is organizing relief shipments to refugee sites across Eastern Europe to aid fleeing Ukrainians. Many locations are already short on critical supplies like food, mattresses, medical supplies (bandages and suture equipment), sanitation kits, and tarps for emergency shelters. By partnering with UNICEF, Project HOPE, and Airlink, and utilizing its relationships with air and freight carriers, Flexport is able to put its expertise and influence to use for this humanitarian crisis.
 

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Magnet Media is a global brand studio that uses storytelling and data to drive measurable business results. Our team is made up of strategists and creative thinkers who use our THINK / MAKE / REACH process to develop a marketing strategy, world-class content, and go-to-market distribution strategies for our clients. Much of our work starts with video storytelling and is distributed across all platforms—appearing in the top media outlets, shared by influential community members, and rising to the top of the search rankings. Recently we've produced award-winning campaigns for clients like Google, Adobe, Chase, Goldman Sachs, Airbnb, IBM, CitiGroup, Carbon, The TED Talks, Politico, Blackrock, TIAA, YouTube, MIT Tech Press, and more.

Magnet Media is a global brand studio that uses storytelling and data to drive measurable business results. Our team is made up of strategists and creative thinkers who use our THINK / MAKE / REACH process to develop a marketing strategy, world-class content, and go-to-market distribution strategies for our clients. Much of our work starts with video storytelling and is distributed across all platforms—appearing in the top media outlets, shared by influential community members, and rising to the top of the search rankings. Recently we've produced award-winning campaigns for clients like Google, Adobe, Chase, Goldman Sachs, Airbnb, IBM, CitiGroup, Carbon, The TED Talks, Politico, Blackrock, TIAA, YouTube, MIT Tech Press, and more.

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