THE STATE OF THE STORY  —  STRATEGIC INSIGHTS
THE STATE OF THE STORY  —  STRATEGIC INSIGHTS

Michael Smith of NPR on Fulfilling Brand’s Mission via Podcasting

Cheryl Overton on Being a Cultural Storyteller

Cheryl Overton on Being a Cultural Storyteller

Cheryl Overton on Being a Cultural Storyteller

Michael Smith of NPR on Fulfilling Brand’s Mission via Podcasting

Michael Smith, CMO of National Public Radio (NPR), gives strategic presentation on NPR's brand and their podcasting strategy to reach the diverse audiences.

NPR's Michael Smith on Diverse Audience and Podcasting Strategy

"People really pay attention when they hear their own voices and perspectives in our content."

"People really pay attention when they hear their own voices and perspectives in our content."

I'm going to share with you why podcasting is such an important part of NPR strategy and why it's a key to how we fulfill our mission going forward. I’m going to take you back in time a little bit and start with the origins of what led to NPR and public media in general.

Back in 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Public Broadcasting Act, which was designed to establish what we know today as public media – PBS, and NPR, and all other stations people listen to – and was one of the capstones of the Great Society programs of the 1960s. In the act, it said that public media was to be an expression of diversity and excellence, which would constitute a source of alternative telecommunication services for all citizens of the nation. Diversity was built into the original founding principles of public media.

I'm going to share with you why podcasting is such an important part of NPR strategy and why it's a key to how we fulfill our mission going forward. I’m going to take you back in time a little bit and start with the origins of what led to NPR and public media in general.

Back in 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Public Broadcasting Act, which was designed to establish what we know today as public media – PBS, and NPR, and all other stations people listen to – and was one of the capstones of the Great Society programs of the 1960s. In the act, it said that public media was to be an expression of diversity and excellence, which would constitute a source of alternative telecommunication services for all citizens of the nation. Diversity was built into the original founding principles of public media.

The Public Broadcasting Act, which was designed to establish what we know today as public media, said that public media was to be an expression of diversity and excellence, which would constitute a source of alternative telecommunication services for all citizens of the nation.

Yet, when you look at how we started, it wasn't quite what was talked about in that statement. The staff of All Things Considered – NPR’s first daily radio show – wasn't the most diverse staff in 1974. Fast forward to 1990, people who were making content for Public Media still looked alike. As a result, the audience for NPR did not reflect the United States population. And today, people of color are about 40% of the U.S. population, while the weekly NPR audience is only about 25% diverse.

Yet, when you look at how we started, it wasn't quite what was talked about in that statement. The staff of All Things Considered – NPR’s first daily radio show – wasn't the most diverse staff in 1974. Fast forward to 1990, people who were making content for Public Media still looked alike. As a result, the audience for NPR did not reflect the United States population. And today, people of color are about 40% of the U.S. population, while the weekly NPR audience is only about 25% diverse.

Yet, when you look at how we started, it wasn't quite what was talked about in that statement. The staff of All Things Considered – NPR’s first daily radio show – wasn't the most diverse staff in 1974. Fast forward to 1990, people who were making content for Public Media still looked alike. As a result, the audience for NPR did not reflect the United States population. And today, people of color are about 40% of the U.S. population, while the weekly NPR audience is only about 25% diverse.

Diversity in NPR's All Things Considered staff.

The Brookings Institution’s 2018 study showed the years when whites will become a minority in the United States by age group. What is particularly interesting to me is the moment that we're at now: 2020 is the year when the majority of people in the United States under the age of 18 are non-white.

The Brookings Institution’s 2018 study showed the years when whites will become a minority in the United States by age group. What is particularly interesting to me is the moment that we're at now: 2020 is the year when the majority of people in the United States under the age of 18 are non-white.

The Brookings Institution’s 2018 study showed the years when whites will become a minority in the United States by age group. What is particularly interesting to me is the moment that we're at now: 2020 is the year when the majority of people in the United States under the age of 18 are non-white.

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Our mission is to create a more informed public, but that public is becoming much more diverse. Now, we need to meet the challenge of what we were and what we were originally founded to do. That's why, at our strategic planning process at NPR, we identified that our number one priority for the next three years is to diversify our audience to reflect and serve America.

A big complication to achieving this is the way we've marketed and communicated over the past 50 years – we've been talking mostly to ourselves. We haven't done a lot of media paid media, partnerships, or promotions outside of the NPR insular, as we have a tremendous fan base (NPR has one of the highest ratings in terms of loyalty and trust among media brands). Over the years, we talked to “NPR kids” who grew up listening to NPR on the backseat of their parents' cars, and then they grew up to become NPR listeners, and who now have NPR kids themselves. As for the communities of color, they haven't heard or seen us, and, therefore, they don’t talk about us.

When comparing NPR to other news brands, brands like ABC and CBS have a higher brand presence than NPR. According to the study conducted in March of 2020, only 28% of the population are aware of the NPR brand. And among people of color, our awareness is even lower as we're about 30% among whites in America, but among blacks are at 21%, among Hispanics and Latinos – 19%. We have a lot of work to do to make ourselves known to the full population of the United States.

Our mission is to create a more informed public, but that public is becoming much more diverse. Now, we need to meet the challenge of what we were and what we were originally founded to do. That's why, at our strategic planning process at NPR, we identified that our number one priority for the next three years is to diversify our audience to reflect and serve America.

A big complication to achieving this is the way we've marketed and communicated over the past 50 years – we've been talking mostly to ourselves. We haven't done a lot of media paid media, partnerships, or promotions outside of the NPR insular, as we have a tremendous fan base (NPR has one of the highest ratings in terms of loyalty and trust among media brands). Over the years, we talked to “NPR kids” who grew up listening to NPR on the backseat of their parents' cars, and then they grew up to become NPR listeners, and who now have NPR kids themselves. As for the communities of color, they haven't heard or seen us, and, therefore, they don’t talk about us.

When comparing NPR to other news brands, brands like ABC and CBS have a higher brand presence than NPR. According to the study conducted in March of 2020, only 28% of the population are aware of the NPR brand. And among people of color, our awareness is even lower as we're about 30% among whites in America, but among blacks are at 21%, among Hispanics and Latinos – 19%. We have a lot of work to do to make ourselves known to the full population of the United States.

Our mission is to create a more informed public, but that public is becoming much more diverse. Now, we need to meet the challenge of what we were and what we were originally founded to do. That's why, at our strategic planning process at NPR, we identified that our number one priority for the next three years is to diversify our audience to reflect and serve America.

A big complication to achieving this is the way we've marketed and communicated over the past 50 years – we've been talking mostly to ourselves. We haven't done a lot of media paid media, partnerships, or promotions outside of the NPR insular, as we have a tremendous fan base (NPR has one of the highest ratings in terms of loyalty and trust among media brands). Over the years, we talked to “NPR kids” who grew up listening to NPR on the backseat of their parents' cars, and then they grew up to become NPR listeners, and who now have NPR kids themselves. As for the communities of color, they haven't heard or seen us, and, therefore, they don’t talk about us.

When comparing NPR to other news brands, brands like ABC and CBS have a higher brand presence than NPR. According to the study conducted in March of 2020, only 28% of the population are aware of the NPR brand. And among people of color, our awareness is even lower as we're about 30% among whites in America, but among blacks are at 21%, among Hispanics and Latinos – 19%. We have a lot of work to do to make ourselves known to the full population of the United States.

"Our mission is to create a more informed public, but that public is becoming much more diverse."

 

"Our mission is to create a more informed public, but that public is becoming much more diverse."

divider-reddots-2lines-v2

Steve Jobs introduced the inclusion of a podcast player in iTunes at Apple's 2005 Worldwide Developers Conference. A lot of people would say that this is when the podcasting age kicked off. This is significant to us because our research shows that diverse audiences are much more likely to come to NPR through our podcast content first. 47% of Asians, 43% of LatinX, and 39% of Black listeners were introduced to our brand through NPR podcasts, which is much higher than the 30% of the white audience. Podcasts are the gateway product for NPR.

Awareness and trial of NPR are lower among people of color. But the good news is that once people try NPR and become aware of us, brand loyalty is actually higher – brand loyalty is 57% for people of color versus 51% for whites.

This is the photograph of Bill Siemering interviewing someone about 45 years ago. Bill was one of the founders of NPR and wrote NPR’s first mission statement. He said that if you have a diversity of the country reflected on-air, you have a diverse audience. People really pay attention when they hear their own voices and perspectives in our content.

Steve Jobs introduced the inclusion of a podcast player in iTunes at Apple's 2005 Worldwide Developers Conference. A lot of people would say that this is when the podcasting age kicked off. This is significant to us because our research shows that diverse audiences are much more likely to come to NPR through our podcast content first. 47% of Asians, 43% of LatinX, and 39% of Black listeners were introduced to our brand through NPR podcasts, which is much higher than the 30% of the white audience. Podcasts are the gateway product for NPR.

Awareness and trial of NPR are lower among people of color. But the good news is that once people try NPR and become aware of us, brand loyalty is actually higher – brand loyalty is 57% for people of color versus 51% for whites.

This is the photograph of Bill Siemering interviewing someone about 45 years ago. Bill was one of the founders of NPR and wrote NPR’s first mission statement. He said that if you have a diversity of the country reflected on-air, you have a diverse audience. If people hear their own voice and their own perspective being acknowledged, they will pay attention. It’s about seeing yourself and hearing yourself in the content.

Steve Jobs introduced the inclusion of a podcast player in iTunes at Apple's 2005 Worldwide Developers Conference. A lot of people would say that this is when the podcasting age kicked off. This is significant to us because our research shows that diverse audiences are much more likely to come to NPR through our podcast content first. 47% of Asians, 43% of LatinX, and 39% of Black listeners were introduced to our brand through NPR podcasts, which is much higher than the 30% of the white audience. Podcasts are the gateway product for NPR.

Awareness and trial of NPR are lower among people of color. But the good news is that once people try NPR and become aware of us, brand loyalty is actually higher – brand loyalty is 57% for people of color versus 51% for whites.

This is the photograph of Bill Siemering interviewing someone about 45 years ago. Bill was one of the founders of NPR and wrote NPR’s first mission statement. He said that if you have a diversity of the country reflected on-air, you have a diverse audience. People really pay attention when they hear their own voices and perspectives in our content.

Bill Siemering was one of the founders of NPR and wrote NPR’s first mission statement.

According to a recent study done by the Collage Group – a research group that does a lot of work on diverse audiences and their relationship with media and multicultural viewers – people are much more likely to seek out shows that reflect their own experiences. 61% of Hispanics are actively looking for shows with Hispanic characters and stories, it’s 67% for Blacks, and for Asians – 52%. What's even more interesting is that Hispanics and Blacks are more likely to seek out stories that feature diverse people characters from other social groups. For example, Hispanics are much more likely than whites to be interested in stories that feature Black characters, and Blacks are much more likely than whites to be interested in stories that feature Hispanic characters. With this, we know that showcasing stories and characters that feature people of color is the best way to attract diverse audiences.

Another very important thing is who's making those stories. Therefore, we have focused on diversifying our newsroom: reporters, writers, staff – people who actually make the content. We know that we're not going to be able to make diverse content without diverse teams. Below are the pictures of the staff of Code Switch with Shereen Marisol Meraji and Gene Demby and It’s Been A Minute with Sam Sanders – one of our most popular shows among diverse audiences – you see how much more diverse it is compared to what we were 35 years ago.

According to a recent study done by the Collage Group – a research group that does a lot of work on diverse audiences and their relationship with media and multicultural viewers – people are much more likely to seek out shows that reflect their own experiences. 61% of Hispanics are actively looking for shows with Hispanic characters and stories, it’s 67% for Blacks, and for Asians – 52%. What's even more interesting is that Hispanics and Blacks are more likely to seek out stories that feature diverse people characters from other social groups. For example, Hispanics are much more likely than whites to be interested in stories that feature Black characters, and Blacks are much more likely than whites to be interested in stories that feature Hispanic characters. With this, we know that showcasing stories and characters that feature people of color is the best way to attract diverse audiences.

Another very important thing is who's making those stories. Therefore, we have focused on diversifying our newsroom: reporters, writers, staff – people who actually make the content. We know that we're not going to be able to make diverse content without diverse teams. Below are the pictures of the staff of Code Switch with Shereen Marisol Meraji and Gene Demby and It’s Been A Minute with Sam Sanders – one of our most popular shows among diverse audiences – you see how much more diverse it is compared to what we were 35 years ago.

According to a recent study done by the Collage Group – a research group that does a lot of work on diverse audiences and their relationship with media and multicultural viewers – people are much more likely to seek out shows that reflect their own experiences. 61% of Hispanics are actively looking for shows with Hispanic characters and stories, it’s 67% for Blacks, and for Asians – 52%. What's even more interesting is that Hispanics and Blacks are more likely to seek out stories that feature diverse people characters from other social groups. For example, Hispanics are much more likely than whites to be interested in stories that feature Black characters, and Blacks are much more likely than whites to be interested in stories that feature Hispanic characters. With this, we know that showcasing stories and characters that feature people of color is the best way to attract diverse audiences.

Another very important thing is who's making those stories. Therefore, we have focused on diversifying our newsroom: reporters, writers, staff – people who actually make the content. We know that we're not going to be able to make diverse content without diverse teams. Below are the pictures of the staff of Code Switch with Shereen Marisol Meraji and Gene Demby and It’s Been A Minute with Sam Sanders – one of our most popular shows among diverse audiences – you see how much more diverse it is compared to what we were 35 years ago.

"People are much more likely to seek out shows that reflect their own experiences."

 

 

The staff of NPR’s Code Switch with Shereen Marisol Meraji and Gene Demby.
The staff of It’s Been A Minute with Sam Sanders – one of our most popular shows among diverse audiences.
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Now, one of our big challenges is that we are talking to ourselves too much, and not talking to people off of our own platforms to build awareness of NPR. So, we started doing more promotion and bartering partnerships with other publishers. To get our word out in places where we think the diverse audiences are, we started partnering with platforms such as Spotify, Google Podcasts, and Apple Podcasts.

This year, Code Switch and It’s Been A Minute were the two key focuses as they were not only behind our mission of diversifying our audience and serving all of America, but they were also right for the moment. America's racial reckoning that took place earlier this year spotlighted the need for these shows. We received a lot of earned promotion from platforms like Google Podcasts and Spotify, which made us part of their daily drive, and Apple featured us in their podcast app. We met the moment by having the right content for what America was. Probably, the biggest nod that we got was from J.Lo, who has about 45 million followers on Twitter, when she included Code Switch as one of the podcasts to listen to.

Now, one of our big challenges is that we are talking to ourselves too much, and not talking to people off of our own platforms to build awareness of NPR. So, we started doing more promotion and bartering partnerships with other publishers. To get our word out in places where we think the diverse audiences are, we started partnering with platforms such as Spotify, Google Podcasts, and Apple Podcasts.

This year, Code Switch and It’s Been A Minute were the two key focuses as they were not only behind our mission of diversifying our audience and serving all of America, but they were also right for the moment. America's racial reckoning that took place earlier this year spotlighted the need for these shows. We received a lot of earned promotion from platforms like Google Podcasts and Spotify, which made us part of their daily drive, and Apple featured us in their podcast app. We met the moment by having the right content for what America was. Probably, the biggest nod that we got was from J.Lo, who has about 45 million followers on Twitter, when she included Code Switch as one of the podcasts to listen to.

Now, one of our big challenges is that we are talking to ourselves too much, and not talking to people off of our own platforms to build awareness of NPR. So, we started doing more promotion and bartering partnerships with other publishers. To get our word out in places where we think the diverse audiences are, we started partnering with platforms such as Spotify, Google Podcasts, and Apple Podcasts.

This year, Code Switch and It’s Been A Minute were the two key focuses as they were not only behind our mission of diversifying our audience and serving all of America, but they were also right for the moment. America's racial reckoning that took place earlier this year spotlighted the need for these shows. We received a lot of earned promotion from platforms like Google Podcasts and Spotify, which made us part of their daily drive, and Apple featured us in their podcast app. We met the moment by having the right content for what America was. Probably, the biggest nod that we got was from J.Lo, who has about 45 million followers on Twitter, when she included Code Switch as one of the podcasts to listen to.

"We met the moment by having the right content for what America was."

 

 

For the first time in NPR history, our key focus has been to put significant money into paid media campaigns. We had amazing results: Code Switch entered the top 20 of all podcasts in the United States, and it was up 209% in average weekly downloads, while the African American listener concentration of the audience doubled. It's Been A Minute also had similar success: it saw 159% increase in average weekly downloads and a 21% increase in listenership among people of color.

Another lesson that we've been learning – which goes back to people seeing themselves in the content– is our marketing materials. Particularly, how we show faces. We haven't historically been doing that at NPR. Being a public service, not-for-profit journalism organization, we've been more about the information and telling stories and less about the “Hollywood stars” that you see more on CNN or MSNBC.

However, it's important that people see themselves reflected in the content. Below is an example of how we used to market Code Switch and It's Been a Minute in comparison to how they are being marketed now. We wanted to show people that there are people like them behind these shows. In the first few months since we’d made the change, the approach was showing great results.

For the first time in NPR history, our key focus has been to put significant money into paid media campaigns. We had amazing results: Code Switch entered the top 20 of all podcasts in the United States, and it was up 209% in average weekly downloads, while the African American listener concentration of the audience doubled. It's Been A Minute also had similar success: it saw 159% increase in average weekly downloads and a 21% increase in listenership among people of color.

Another lesson that we've been learning – which goes back to people seeing themselves in the content– is our marketing materials. Particularly, how we show faces. We haven't historically been doing that at NPR. Being a public service, not-for-profit journalism organization, we've been more about the information and telling stories and less about the “Hollywood stars” that you see more on CNN or MSNBC.

However, it's important that people see themselves reflected in the content. Below is an example of how we used to market Code Switch and It's Been a Minute in comparison to how they are being marketed now. We wanted to show people that there are people like them behind these shows. In the first few months since we’d made the change, the approach was showing great results.

For the first time in NPR history, our key focus has been to put significant money into paid media campaigns. We had amazing results: Code Switch entered the top 20 of all podcasts in the United States, and it was up 209% in average weekly downloads, while the African American listener concentration of the audience doubled. It's Been A Minute also had similar success: it saw 159% increase in average weekly downloads and a 21% increase in listenership among people of color.

Another lesson that we've been learning – which goes back to people seeing themselves in the content– is our marketing materials. Particularly, how we show faces. We haven't historically been doing that at NPR. Being a public service, not-for-profit journalism organization, we've been more about the information and telling stories and less about the “Hollywood stars” that you see more on CNN or MSNBC.

However, it's important that people see themselves reflected in the content. Below is an example of how we used to market Code Switch and It's Been a Minute in comparison to how they are being marketed now. We wanted to show people that there are people like them behind these shows. In the first few months since we’d made the change, the approach was showing great results.

An example of how we used to market Code Switch and It's Been a Minute in comparison to how they are being marketed now.

Through Line is a show about the history and how it applies to the moment that we're living in. It covers stories about the history of policing, protest, movements, and the caste system. It's another great example of a show that features diverse storytellers and is resonating with our diverse audience.

In October 2020, we launched a new show – Louder Than A Riot. It’s groundbreaking for us. NPR Music had amazing success in the last two or three years with Tiny Desk concerts, which has become a YouTube pop sensation. We are trying to take that franchise beyond just music performance and connect music to culture. Rodney Carmichael and Sidney Madden, hosts of the show, talk a lot about the intersection of hip hop culture and the criminal justice system. They dive into some of the most interesting criminal cases that have been related to the hip hop world over the last 15 or 20 years.

We're going to feature our afternoon podcast Consider This, hosted by an African American woman named Audie Cornish, and our daily Pop Culture Happy Hour, hosted by Aisha Harris and three other hosts, as part of our “daily habits” strategy. One of the things that we found about younger audio listeners is that they still want this daily experience of listening to their favorite daily news show, but they want to have it available on-demand. Thus, we have launched a suite of “daily habit podcasts”.

Through Line is a show about the history and how it applies to the moment that we're living in. It covers stories about the history of policing, protest, movements, and the caste system. It's another great example of a show that features diverse storytellers and is resonating with our diverse audience.

In October 2020, we launched a new show – Louder Than A Riot. It’s groundbreaking for us. NPR Music had amazing success in the last two or three years with Tiny Desk concerts, which has become a YouTube pop sensation. We are trying to take that franchise beyond just music performance and connect music to culture. Rodney Carmichael and Sidney Madden, hosts of the show, talk a lot about the intersection of hip hop culture and the criminal justice system. They dive into some of the most interesting criminal cases that have been related to the hip hop world over the last 15 or 20 years.

We're going to feature our afternoon podcast Consider This, hosted by an African American woman named Audie Cornish, and our daily Pop Culture Happy Hour, hosted by Aisha Harris and three other hosts, as part of our “daily habits” strategy. One of the things that we found about younger audio listeners is that they still want this daily experience of listening to their favorite daily news show, but they want to have it available on-demand. Thus, we have launched a suite of “daily habit podcasts”.

Through Line is a show about the history and how it applies to the moment that we're living in. It covers stories about the history of policing, protest, movements, and the caste system. It's another great example of a show that features diverse storytellers and is resonating with our diverse audience.

In October 2020, we launched a new show – Louder Than A Riot. It’s groundbreaking for us. NPR Music had amazing success in the last two or three years with Tiny Desk concerts, which has become a YouTube pop sensation. We are trying to take that franchise beyond just music performance and connect music to culture. Rodney Carmichael and Sidney Madden, hosts of the show, talk a lot about the intersection of hip hop culture and the criminal justice system. They dive into some of the most interesting criminal cases that have been related to the hip hop world over the last 15 or 20 years.

We're going to feature our afternoon podcast Consider This, hosted by an African American woman named Audie Cornish, and our daily Pop Culture Happy Hour, hosted by Aisha Harris and three other hosts, as part of our “daily habits” strategy. One of the things that we found about younger audio listeners is that they still want this daily experience of listening to their favorite daily news show, but they want to have it available on-demand. Thus, we have launched a suite of “daily habit podcasts”.

divider-reddots-2lines-v2

At NPR, our big challenge is to fulfill our mission by reaching all of America. We are called National Public Radio, and the “public” part means everyone. We have a good story to tell, given the amount of diversity we have among people who work behind the scenes at NPR and in our content. The biggest challenge is getting the word out and increasing awareness.

We are a welcoming place with the content that's going to improve your life – from understanding how to manage your finances to what to do about COVID to simply enjoying yourself with great music and relaxation.

At NPR, our big challenge is to fulfill our mission by reaching all of America. We are called National Public Radio, and the “public” part means everyone. We have a good story to tell, given the amount of diversity we have among people who work behind the scenes at NPR and in our content. The biggest challenge is getting the word out and increasing awareness.

We are a welcoming place with the content that's going to improve your life – from understanding how to manage your finances to what to do about COVID to simply enjoying yourself with great music and relaxation.

At NPR, our big challenge is to fulfill our mission by reaching all of America. We are called National Public Radio, and the “public” part means everyone. We have a good story to tell, given the amount of diversity we have among people who work behind the scenes at NPR and in our content. The biggest challenge is getting the word out and increasing awareness.

We are a welcoming place with the content that's going to improve your life – from understanding how to manage your finances to what to do about COVID to simply enjoying yourself with great music and relaxation.

divider-reddots-2lines-v2

"It's important that people see themselves reflected in the content."

 

 

Michael Smith and Shereen Marisol Meraji, co-host and senior producer at Code Switch, were the guest speakers at The State of the Story Summit 2020. Watch their session "The New NPR: Diversifying & Modernizing a Traditional Media Brand".

At NPR, our big challenge is to fulfill our mission by reaching all of America. We are called National Public Radio, and the “public” part means everyone. We have a good story to tell, given the amount of diversity we have among people who work behind the scenes at NPR and in our content. The biggest challenge is getting the word out and increasing awareness.

We are a welcoming place with the content that's going to improve your life – from understanding how to manage your finances to what to do about COVID to simply enjoying yourself with great music and relaxation.

Michael Smith and Shereen Marisol Meraji, co-host and senior producer at Code Switch, were the guest speakers at The State of the Story Summit 2020. Watch their session "The New NPR: Diversifying & Modernizing a Traditional Media Brand".

QUICK FACTS & STATS
QUICK FACTS & STATS

30%

26%

The share of time spent listening to spoken-word audio in the U.S. has increased by 30% since 2014.

Source: Edison Research/NPR

of Black people, 10% of Hispanic people, and 3% of Asians feel represented in advertising, compared to 59% of White people.

Source: Adobe Digital Insights, Diversity in Advertising, 2019

20%

38%

The total podcast audience is growing at a compound average growth rate of 20%.

Source: Nielsen’s Podcast Listener Buying Power database

of U.S. consumers said that they are more likely to trust a brand that shows more diversity in its marketing.

Source: Adobe Digital Insights, Diversity In Advertising, 2019

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