THE STATE OF THE STORY  —  5 QUESTIONS
THE STATE OF THE STORY  —  5 QUESTIONS

The Media Mix: Andy Wiedlin Thinks Podcasts Can Make Converts of Us All

The Media Mix: Andy Wiedlin Thinks Podcasts Can Make Converts of Us All

The Media Mix: Andy Wiedlin Thinks Podcasts Can Make Converts of Us All

The Media Mix: Andy Wiedlin Thinks Podcasts Can Make Converts of Us All

The Media Mix: Andy Wiedlin Thinks Podcasts Can Make Converts of Us All

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For 10 years, Andy Wiedlin has been an advisor and friend of Magnet Media. That’s because for decades Wiedlin has been involved in some of the most innovative tech and media companies. The former CRO at Buzzfeed, SVP at HuffPost, and VP at both MySpace and Yahoo obsesses over effective, sensible marketing and advertising strategies.

“I’m a bit of a savant,” Wiedlin says. “Pretty much going back 50 years, I can name any major ad campaign or jingle or tagline. My brain is just wired that way. And I celebrate the awesomeness of great ads. But I also think we can do a lot better, especially in the digital space.” 

It’s this mix of infatuation and irritation that makes Wiedlin’s podcast, Backstage with the Brand, now in its second season, such a fascinating listen. Wiedlin books industry luminaries like Randall Rothenberg, president and CEO of Interactive Advertising Bureau, to delve into the day’s trends and history’s lessons. 

“I select guests that are interesting, that have a take. I try to find people whom I don’t necessarily agree with. It’s like a panel, if you have a panel with all the people saying the same thing and agreeing with each other it’s boring,” says Wiedlin. “

We got his take on podcasting and how brands can maximize its impact.

For 10 years, Andy Wiedlin has been an advisor and friend of Magnet Media. That’s because for decades Wiedlin has been involved in some of the most innovative tech and media companies. The former CRO at Buzzfeed, SVP at Huffington Post, and VP at both MySpace and Yahoo obsesses over effective, sensible marketing and advertising strategies.

“I’m a bit of a savant,” Wiedlin says. “Pretty much going back 50 years, I can name any major ad campaign or jingle or tagline. My brain is just wired that way. And I celebrate the awesomeness of great ads. But I also think we can do a lot better, especially in the digital space.” 

It’s this mix of infatuation and irritation that makes Wiedlin’s podcast, Backstage with the Brand, now in its second season, such a fascinating listen. Wiedlin books industry luminaries like Randall Rothenberg, president and CEO of Interactive Advertising Bureau, to delve into the day’s trends and history’s lessons. 

“I select guests that are interesting, that have a take. I try to find people whom I don’t necessarily agree with. It’s like a panel, if you have a panel with all the people saying the same thing and agreeing with each other it’s boring,” says Wiedlin. “

We got his take on podcasting and how brands can maximize its impact.

For 10 years, Andy Wiedlin has been an advisor and friend of Magnet Media. That’s because for decades Wiedlin has been involved in some of the most innovative tech and media companies. The former CRO at Buzzfeed, SVP at Huffington Post, and VP at both MySpace and Yahoo obsesses over effective, sensible marketing and advertising strategies.

“I’m a bit of a savant,” Wiedlin says. “Pretty much going back 50 years, I can name any major ad campaign or jingle or tagline. My brain is just wired that way. And I celebrate the awesomeness of great ads. But I also think we can do a lot better, especially in the digital space.” 

It’s this mix of infatuation and irritation that makes Wiedlin’s podcast, Backstage with the Brand, now in its second season, such a fascinating listen. Wiedlin books industry luminaries like Randall Rothenberg, president and CEO of Interactive Advertising Bureau, to delve into the day’s trends and history’s lessons. 

“I select guests that are interesting, that have a take. I try to find people whom I don’t necessarily agree with. It’s like a panel, if you have a panel with all the people saying the same thing and agreeing with each other it’s boring,” says Wiedlin. “

We got his take on podcasting and how brands can maximize its impact.

For 10 years, Andy Wiedlin has been an advisor and friend of Magnet Media. That’s because for decades Wiedlin has been involved in some of the most innovative tech and media companies. The former CRO at Buzzfeed, SVP at Huffington Post, and VP at both MySpace and Yahoo obsesses over effective, sensible marketing and advertising strategies.

“I’m a bit of a savant,” Wiedlin says. “Pretty much going back 50 years, I can name any major ad campaign or jingle or tagline. My brain is just wired that way. And I celebrate the awesomeness of great ads. But I also think we can do a lot better, especially in the digital space.” 

It’s this mix of infatuation and irritation that makes Wiedlin’s podcast, Backstage with the Brand, now in its second season, such a fascinating listen. Wiedlin books industry luminaries like Randall Rothenberg, president and CEO of Interactive Advertising Bureau, to delve into the day’s trends and history’s lessons. 

“I select guests that are interesting, that have a take. I try to find people whom I don’t necessarily agree with. It’s like a panel, if you have a panel with all the people saying the same thing and agreeing with each other it’s boring,” says Wiedlin. “

We got his take on podcasting and how brands can maximize its impact.

For 10 years, Andy Wiedlin has been an advisor and friend of Magnet Media. That’s because for decades Wiedlin has been involved in some of the most innovative tech and media companies. The former CRO at Buzzfeed, SVP at Huffington Post, and VP at both MySpace and Yahoo obsesses over effective, sensible marketing and advertising strategies.

“I’m a bit of a savant,” Wiedlin says. “Pretty much going back 50 years, I can name any major ad campaign or jingle or tagline. My brain is just wired that way. And I celebrate the awesomeness of great ads. But I also think we can do a lot better, especially in the digital space.” 

It’s this mix of infatuation and irritation that makes Wiedlin’s podcast, Backstage with the Brand, now in its second season, such a fascinating listen. Wiedlin books industry luminaries like Randall Rothenberg, president and CEO of Interactive Advertising Bureau, to delve into the day’s trends and history’s lessons. 

“I select guests that are interesting, that have a take. I try to find people whom I don’t necessarily agree with. It’s like a panel, if you have a panel with all the people saying the same thing and agreeing with each other it’s boring,” says Wiedlin. “

We got his take on podcasting and how brands can maximize its impact.

01. Why is the podcast space one that interests you?

01. Why is the podcast space one that interests you?

01. Why is the podcast space one that interests you?

If you want to reach a large audience you can’t just do it on television, or online, or on large social platforms. You need to diversify, and audio is an important way to reach thoughtful, influential people in an uninterrupted way. When people listen to podcasts it’s during their personal time, they're doing it to learn or be entertained. And you have a captive audience. Now, you don’t have sight, sound, and motion but you have the best audience that’s devoted to listening. To me that makes it a very interesting medium, and it’s growing in scale. So it has to be part of any thoughtful media plan.

It’s a relatively new medium that we haven’t screwed up yet. The reason I say that is with podcasting you have a 100 percent dedicated, devoted tuning in audience and the ad load on podcast is very reasonable. If you look at television, the ad load used to be reasonable but we killed the golden goose. We went from 1-minute ad pods, to 2-minute ad podes, to 5-minute ad pods–it’s almost impossible to watch television. Whereas with podcasts you have the host maybe an intro message and maybe halfway through there’s a message and at the end there’s a message. It’s very uncluttered, it’s mostly content, and it’s a way for an advertiser to reach audiences in a respectful manner when they’re totally tuned in.

If you want to reach a large audience you can’t just do it on television, or online, or on large social platforms. You need to diversify, and audio is an important way to reach thoughtful, influential people in an uninterrupted way. When people listen to podcasts it’s during their personal time, they're doing it to learn or be entertained. And you have a captive audience. Now, you don’t have sight, sound, and motion but you have the best audience that’s devoted to listening. To me that makes it a very interesting medium, and it’s growing in scale. So it has to be part of any thoughtful media plan.

It’s a relatively new medium that we haven’t screwed up yet. The reason I say that is with podcasting you have a 100 percent dedicated, devoted tuning in audience and the ad load on podcast is very reasonable. If you look at television, the ad load used to be reasonable but we killed the golden goose. We went from 1-minute ad pods, to 2-minute ad podes, to 5-minute ad pods–it’s almost impossible to watch television. Whereas with podcasts you have the host maybe an intro message and maybe halfway through there’s a message and at the end there’s a message. It’s very uncluttered, it’s mostly content, and it’s a way for an advertiser to reach audiences in a respectful manner when they’re totally tuned in.

If you want to reach a large audience you can’t just do it on television, or online, or on large social platforms. You need to diversify, and audio is an important way to reach thoughtful, influential people in an uninterrupted way. When people listen to podcasts it’s during their personal time, they're doing it to learn or be entertained. And you have a captive audience. Now, you don’t have sight, sound, and motion but you have the best audience that’s devoted to listening. To me that makes it a very interesting medium, and it’s growing in scale. So it has to be part of any thoughtful media plan.

It’s a relatively new medium that we haven’t screwed up yet. The reason I say that is with podcasting you have a 100 percent dedicated, devoted tuning in audience and the ad load on podcast is very reasonable. If you look at television, the ad load used to be reasonable but we killed the golden goose. We went from 1-minute ad pods, to 2-minute ad podes, to 5-minute ad pods–it’s almost impossible to watch television. Whereas with podcasts you have the host maybe an intro message and maybe halfway through there’s a message and at the end there’s a message. It’s very uncluttered, it’s mostly content, and it’s a way for an advertiser to reach audiences in a respectful manner when they’re totally tuned in.

“When people listen to podcasts it’s during their personal time, they're doing it to learn or be entertained. And you have a captive audience."

02. How can brands choose the right podcast to partner with?

02. How can brands choose the right podcast to partner with?

02. How can brands choose the right podcast to partner with?

As far as finding podcasts that align with their brands, that’s a fun exercise. I know there are companies that are doing scientific analysis of who’s listening and if that’s the audience they want to reach, but just looking at the name, the host, and the guests I think it’s easy to come up with a plan that makes sense for brands. You can dip your toe in the water and then expand the number of podcasts you sponsor. Sponsoring is relatively easy. Get a live read by the host. Or you can get into the podcast creation space which is a different kettle of fish but it’s something Magnet is good at and it’s something brands might want to consider.

Here’s what leaders need to understand: diversity of thought doesn’t happen without diversity of representation. When you have all those points of views, life experiences, and cultural backgrounds coming together around a table–colliding, clashing, and collaborating–that’s when magic happens. That’s when we come up with that one breakthrough idea, campaign, innovation, to authentically and purposefully serve customers and communities. If you truly understand and believe in the power of diverse workforces, then you will be more thoughtful in your approach.

As far as finding podcasts that align with their brands, that’s a fun exercise. I know there are companies that are doing scientific analysis of who’s listening and if that’s the audience they want to reach, but just looking at the name, the host, and the guests I think it’s easy to come up with a plan that makes sense for brands. You can dip your toe in the water and then expand the number of podcasts you sponsor. Sponsoring is relatively easy. Get a live read by the host. Or you can get into the podcast creation space which is a different kettle of fish but it’s something Magnet is good at and it’s something brands might want to consider.

As far as finding podcasts that align with their brands, that’s a fun exercise. I know there are companies that are doing scientific analysis of who’s listening and if that’s the audience they want to reach, but just looking at the name, the host, and the guests I think it’s easy to come up with a plan that makes sense for brands. You can dip your toe in the water and then expand the number of podcasts you sponsor. Sponsoring is relatively easy. Get a live read by the host. Or you can get into the podcast creation space which is a different kettle of fish but it’s something Magnet is good at and it’s something brands might want to consider.

03. What would push a brand to launch their own podcast versus just sponsoring one?

03. How does making time like this affect you as a leader?

03. What would push a brand to launch their own podcast versus just sponsoring?

The first step is definitely to sponsor a podcast. It’s easy there are millions of podcasts to sponsor, that make sense for a brand to sponsor. To create their own podcast, brands really have to have something to say. Something unique. And they have to know their audience. 

Maybe if it’s a large company, their audience is their employees. It’s a better way to share the strategy, principles, and mission of the company in a way that relates with employees. If it’s a brand that wants to reach out to customers, it has to be interesting. It can’t be totally brand focused. It has to be aligned with what the brand’s values are, and then you create content around that.

The first step is definitely to sponsor a podcast. It’s easy there are millions of podcasts to sponsor, that make sense for a brand to sponsor. To create their own podcast, brands really have to have something to say. Something unique. And they have to know their audience. 

Maybe if it’s a large company, their audience is their employees. It’s a better way to share the strategy, principles, and mission of the company in a way that relates with employees. If it’s a brand that wants to reach out to customers, it has to be interesting. It can’t be totally brand focused. It has to be aligned with what the brand’s values are, and then you create content around that.

The first step is definitely to sponsor a podcast. It’s easy there are millions of podcasts to sponsor, that make sense for a brand to sponsor. To create their own podcast, brands really have to have something to say. Something unique. And they have to know their audience. 

Maybe if it’s a large company, their audience is their employees. It’s a better way to share the strategy, principles, and mission of the company in a way that relates with employees. If it’s a brand that wants to reach out to customers, it has to be interesting. It can’t be totally brand focused. It has to be aligned with what the brand’s values are, and then you create content around that.

The first step is definitely to sponsor a podcast. It’s easy there are millions of podcasts to sponsor, that make sense for a brand to sponsor. To create their own podcast, brands really have to have something to say. Something unique. And they have to know their audience. 

Maybe if it’s a large company, their audience is their employees. It’s a better way to share the strategy, principles, and mission of the company in a way that relates with employees. If it’s a brand that wants to reach out to customers, it has to be interesting. It can’t be totally brand focused. It has to be aligned with what the brand’s values are, and then you create content around that.

04. How do you find your audience?

04. How do you find your audience?

04. How do you find your audience?

An interesting thing about content, whether its podcasts or viral digital content, the audience selects the content, the content doesn’t really select the audience. You try to appeal to a certain group but consumers are completely in charge. Like-minded people share this content with other like-minded people. 

I don’t have a science behind this. I don’t have a big goal to reach a certain group of people. I want to share my love of advertising. I also want to share that I’m horrified by what we’ve created. We had this huge run where digital advertising has taken over and yet our ad products, our creative campaigns, the stories that we tell can be so much better.

An interesting thing about content, whether its podcasts or viral digital content, the audience selects the content, the content doesn’t really select the audience. You try to appeal to a certain group but consumers are completely in charge. Like-minded people share this content with other like-minded people. 

I don’t have a science behind this. I don’t have a big goal to reach a certain group of people. I want to share my love of advertising. I also want to share that I’m horrified by what we’ve created. We had this huge run where digital advertising has taken over and yet our ad products, our creative campaigns, the stories that we tell can be so much better.

An interesting thing about content, whether its podcasts or viral digital content, the audience selects the content, the content doesn’t really select the audience. You try to appeal to a certain group but consumers are completely in charge. Like-minded people share this content with other like-minded people. 

I don’t have a science behind this. I don’t have a big goal to reach a certain group of people. I want to share my love of advertising. I also want to share that I’m horrified by what we’ve created. We had this huge run where digital advertising has taken over and yet our ad products, our creative campaigns, the stories that we tell can be so much better.

An interesting thing about content, whether its podcasts or viral digital content, the audience selects the content, the content doesn’t really select the audience. You try to appeal to a certain group but consumers are completely in charge. Like-minded people share this content with other like-minded people. 

I don’t have a science behind this. I don’t have a big goal to reach a certain group of people. I want to share my love of advertising. I also want to share that I’m horrified by what we’ve created. We had this huge run where digital advertising has taken over and yet our ad products, our creative campaigns, the stories that we tell can be so much better.

“An interesting thing about content, whether its podcasts or viral digital content, the audience selects the content, the content doesn’t really select the audience. You try to appeal to a certain group but consumers are completely in charge."

05. What brands are doing this well right now?

05. What brands are doing this well right now?

05. What brands are doing this well right now?

There is some great stuff out there. The great brands are figuring out a way to create a brand so strong that they can get their message across in 6 seconds. Let’s start with TV advertising. I think Progressive always nails it. Always funny. They get in the brand attributes, people love it, people share it. I feel the same about Mountain Dew and Old Spice, and brands that don’t take themselves so seriously. They use humor. They delight audiences and yet they get their message across.

There is some great stuff out there. The great brands are figuring out a way to create a brand so strong that they can get their message across in 6 seconds. Let’s start with TV advertising. I think Progressive always nails it. Always funny. They get in the brand attributes, people love it, people share it. I feel the same about Mountain Dew and Old Spice, and brands that don’t take themselves so seriously. They use humor. They delight audiences and yet they get their message across.

There is some great stuff out there. The great brands are figuring out a way to create a brand so strong that they can get their message across in 6 seconds. Let’s start with TV advertising. I think Progressive always nails it. Always funny. They get in the brand attributes, people love it, people share it. I feel the same about Mountain Dew and Old Spice, and brands that don’t take themselves so seriously. They use humor. They delight audiences and yet they get their message across.

For more insights and conversations about advertising, subscribe to Backstage with the Brand through your favorite podcast provider.

For more insights and conversations about advertising, subscribe to Backstage with the Brands through your favorite podcast provider.

For more insights and conversations about advertising, subscribe to Backstage with the Brands through your favorite podcast provider.

For more insights and conversations about advertising, subscribe to Backstage with the Brands through your favorite podcast provider.

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Magnet Media is a global brand studio that uses storytelling and data to drive measurable business results. Our team is made up of strategists and creative thinkers who use our THINK / MAKE / REACH process to develop a marketing strategy, world-class content, and go-to-market distribution strategies for our clients. Much of our work starts with video storytelling and is distributed across all platforms—appearing in the top media outlets, shared by influential community members, and rising to the top of the search rankings. Recently we've produced award-winning campaigns for clients like Google, Adobe, Chase, Goldman Sachs, Airbnb, IBM, CitiGroup, Carbon, The TED Talks, Politico, Blackrock, TIAA, YouTube, MIT Tech Press, and more.

Magnet Media is a global brand studio that uses storytelling and data to drive measurable business results. Our team is made up of strategists and creative thinkers who use our THINK / MAKE / REACH process to develop a marketing strategy, world-class content, and go-to-market distribution strategies for our clients. Much of our work starts with video storytelling and is distributed across all platforms—appearing in the top media outlets, shared by influential community members, and rising to the top of the search rankings. Recently we've produced award-winning campaigns for clients like Google, Adobe, Chase, Goldman Sachs, Airbnb, IBM, CitiGroup, Carbon, The TED Talks, Politico, Blackrock, TIAA, YouTube, MIT Tech Press, and more.

Magnet Media is a global brand studio that uses storytelling and data to drive measurable business results. Our team is made up of strategists and creative thinkers who use our THINK / MAKE / REACH process to develop a marketing strategy, world-class content, and go-to-market distribution strategies for our clients. Much of our work starts with video storytelling and is distributed across all platforms—appearing in the top media outlets, shared by influential community members, and rising to the top of the search rankings. Recently we've produced award-winning campaigns for clients like Google, Adobe, Chase, Goldman Sachs, Airbnb, IBM, CitiGroup, Carbon, The TED Talks, Politico, Blackrock, TIAA, YouTube, MIT Tech Press, and more.

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